The Best of 2017

2017 was not a great year for me as a blogger. Honestly, I lost motivation and went long stretches without writing anything. Perhaps you noticed. Probably, you didn’t.

Nonetheless, some people somewhere read some of the articles I scratched out. Thus, I present to you:

best of the best awardThe Most Read New Articles of 2017.

1. God’s Not a Conservative.

I confess that I cheated a bit on this title. It’s a little click-bait-ish. I try not to feature articles on politics, but this one may step into the swamp a little. My main angst is that many people treat “conservatism” as a wonderful value. Sure, it seems safe, but I’m not sure that safe is a goal, and certainly not Godly. It doesn’t mean that there’s no place for a conservative outlook on life, but it’s not the answer to a universal utopia.

2. Can I Measure Spiritual Maturity

This post from August gathered more “views per month” than any other new post in 2018. Too many people confuse the path to spiritual maturity with longevity. Church leaders often presume that people who’ve been in church the longest are the most mature. It takes guts to say to a 30 year church veteran, “You haven’t matured. You’re still a spiritual infant.” This difficulty arises, in part, because most people don’t have a clear idea of what spiritual maturity looks like in the lives of others, or themselves.

The next three articles on the list feature guest authors who were part of the Summer Blog Tour “Faith Unshackled”. You can read the entire collection of articles HERE.

3. Less Dogma – More Doing by Ryan Lassiter

4. Faith Unshackled: A Case Study by Ginger Moore

5. Your Shackles Have Names by John Dobbs

6. Why Self-Control is Deceptive

We all have a self-control problem because we all have a sin problem. Ultimately, sin occurs when self-control fails. Since the Bible repeatedly instructs Christians to exhibit self-control, we often experience guilt when we read those passages. We can all think of times when we’ve lost self-control and reading these passages amplifies our sense personal inadequacy. But what if “self-control” doesn’t mean what we think it does….?

7. Gentleness: Good or Bad?

Each family has its own set of virtues that the parents want to pass on to their children. Some might emphasise politeness, others might emphasise independence. God also gives his children lists of virtues for us to incorporate into our lives. Sometimes these virtues are at odds with our cultural values. How about gentleness? Is it an effeminate trait, or something we should work toward becoming?

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