Tagged: greatness

Seeking a Purpose

This blog post is based on a sermon that you can listen to HERE.

James John SeekingThe Gospels tell two stories of private interactions between Jesus and his disciples that provide a glimpse into the ambitions of Jesus’ closest disciples.

  1. The Twelve argue among themselves over who is the greatest. (Mark 9:34)
  2. James and John request the seats either side of Jesus’ throne in his kingdom. (Mark 10:35-37)

In most discussions of these texts that I’ve heard, people generally criticise the disciples for using Jesus to obtain personal gain. This seems valid criticism. The disciples’ motives seem selfish and unholy.

When we arrive at this conclusion, it appears that we now understand the text as a warning against pride and selfishness and we can move on to the next passage. However, I believe that we can glean more from this text before moving on.

We could easily observe the disciples’ behaviour and conclude that the desire to succeed or achieve as a Jesus follower is an improper desire. Instead, we should endeavour to make our goals and ambitions consistent with God’s will.

Greatness is a worthy goal. How we define greatness is vital. Jesus provides a definition in Mark 9:35 “Anyone who wants to be first must be the very last,and servant of all.” Importantly, Jesus doesn’t say, “Don’t aspire to greatness.” Rather he describes a holy path to greatness.

James and John made the mistake of seeking something that wasn’t theirs to seek, or even Jesus’ to give. I wonder, if they had asked Jesus to give them the ministry of primary apostolic healers if Jesus wouldn’t have honoured that request.

greatness 01

So how about us?

The idea of spiritual ambitions seems dangerous to most Christians I know. Yes, Paul tells Timothy to identify men that desire the role of shepherd in the church. But if someone starts wanting that role too much, we get nervous. This creates the problem of discerning the difference between ‘ambition’ and ‘excessive ambition’. So more often than not we frown upon ambition as pride and therefore an ungodly attitude.

Fear of ambitious Christians results in churches filled with people who have few goals and dreams for where their faith could take them. Without goals how can a person determine the next step in their faith walk?

This is a long introduction to what I hope will prove to be a helpful list of concrete ambitions Christians can choose. While I recognise the danger of trying to put the Holy Spirit in a box or define his job, I also realise that I don’t function well in the abstract. Simply telling me to, “walk by faith” doesn’t help me very much, I need more definite instructions. So, here are some ideas, and I’d love for you to add some of yours in the comments section below!

Possible Goals for Spiritual Growth

  1. Read the Bible all the way through.
  2. Lead a ministry at church.
  3. Start an NPO to make a difference in the lives of your community.
  4. Become a small group leader.
  5. Go on a 24hr silent retreat.
  6. Baptize someone.
  7. Go on a mission trip.
  8. Teach a children’s Bible class
  9. Increase your giving. (Aim at a specific percentage.)
  10. Memorize Scripture.
  11. Read the Bible daily.  (Find all sorts of reading plans HERE.)
  12. Attend a Bible or ministry conference/workshop.
  13. Raise a godly family.
  14. Host a small group in your home.
  15. Take Bible courses from a college. (So many are offered online now.)
  16. Intentionally encourage someone every day. (Be able to name that person at the end of the day.)
  17. Make a friend of someone from a different faith background.
  18. Strive to live in such a way that others will describe you as generous.
  19. Reach a point where you can honestly say that you love your enemies. In the meantime, pray good things for them and their families.
  20. Spiritually mentor someone.
  21. Tell a nonbeliever why you’re a Christian.
  22. Regularly practice fasting.
  23. Visit the Holy Land.
  24. Create a work of art (painting, sculpting, song, poem, whatever) that explores an aspect of your faith.
  25. Share a meal with all your neighbors (one at a time).
  26. Identify an organization you can volunteer at regularly.
  27. Lead a ministry at your church.
  28. Become a foreign missionary.
  29. Regularly read the Bible and have spiritual conversations with your grand/children.
  30. Cook a meal for someone else each month/week. Maybe they eat it with you. Maybe you just deliver it.
  31. Pray with another person (not always the same person) each week.
  32. Give money to a mission work, or new church plant in the U.S..
  33. Make a new friend with someone from a different ethnic background.
  34. Adopt a college student.
  35. Read a religious book other than the Bible each year/6 months.
  36. Become a full-time minister.
  37. Commit to being an ethical voice in your workplace.
  38. Raise money for worthy causes.
  39. Attend every church work day.
  40. Prioritise Sunday worship with the body of Christ.
  41. Intentionally express gratitude to someone every day.
  42. Love your spouse, so that they know it.

Most of these goals take more than a moment to fulfill. They’re something to work towards, to aspire to complete. Because spiritual growth is a process.

I dream of the day when I might ask each member of my congregation, “Which aspect of your walk with God are you working on at the moment?” and they’d have a response that was ambitious rather than guilt-ridden.

This list results from random brainstorming rather than profound meditation. I hope it provides a spark for you set some spiritual goals that you might pursue spiritual greatness by becoming the servant of all.

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